dunstan tree
Chestnut Trees

Chestnuts are nothing short of highly nutritious wildlife magnets that produce crops annually beginning at a very young age…in fact its highly possible to see a few nuts on saplings as young as three years old. And chestnuts aren’t just … Continued

not rated $24.00 Add to cart
Nuttall Oak Trees-4-6 ft
Nuttall Oak Trees-4-6 ft
This red oak is a sure-fire winner for ducks, deer, and folks who don’t think they have a green thumb! Nuttall oaks are easy to establish, and grow like a weed as a young tree. Even better, Nuttalls can tolerate poorly drained sites more so than any other red oak. Wait there’s more! Many of our Nuttalls don’t even think about dropping until December, which means one of the highest carb acorns (about 45%) are on the ground when ducks and bucks need energy the most. Deer people: Plant Nuttalls in the back corner of your favorite big late season food plot, or along their favorite trail leading to that plot. Duckers: Establish Nuttalls in areas that can be flooded most every winter. Remember all duck holes need an occasional break from flooding. Call our MOLES staff for more help on establishing and managing oaks in your timber holes. Nuttall oak is definitely on our top five list of favorite oaks! Type: Zone: Red Oak section 5 - 9 Soil pH: 4.5 - 6.5 Mature Height: 100' Wildlife Value: Acorns are a favorite to deer and wild turkey. Also important to squirrels because acorns remain in the tree well into January when most habitat is flooding. Site Preference: Naturally occurs on poorly drained bottom sites. Tolerates intermittent flooding during the dormant season. Thrives when planted on moist, fertile sites with good drainage. Nut Maturity Date: November to January (varies) Alias: Texas Red Oak, Red Oak, Red River Oak, Pin Oak, Striped Oak
not rated $18.00 Add to cart
Sawtooth Oak-4-6 ft
Sawtooth Oak-4-6 ft
Type: Cerris Oak (not red or white) Zone: 5 - 9 Soil pH: 4.4 - 7.1 Mature Height: 80' Wildlife Value: Large early dropping, abundance of acorns favored by deer and most all other wildlife. Site Preference: Must have plenty of sun and prefers fertile, well-drained soil to thrive and produce heavy mast crops. Nut Maturity Date: September to October Alias: Oriental Oak, Gobbler Oak Sawtooth oak has been an American citizen for quite some time, and proves itself a winner in our book as the first to provide hard mast for all walks of wildlife. Acorns rain down annually, at a critical time when other oaks haven’t even thought of shedding. Sawtooths are so productive that we can fill the back of a pickup with acorns from three trees! Trail camera folks and early season bow hunters should all agree that sawtooth oak is a winner. Plant a few groves near the cabin or close to your property’s perimeter for a low impact, easy access, and early season “sure thing” hunting spot. Acorns drop from mid-September to mid-October and as early as year six from seed on better sites, but we’ve seen them produce younger than that. This particular seedling comes from a ‘gobbler’ selection which we believe produces a heavier crop than the larger seeded strains.
not rated $18.00 Add to cart
Bartlett Pear Tree
Bartlett Pear Tree
Known as America’s favorite pear, the Bartlett variety actually came from Europe. It functions as the standard by which all other pears are measured and is a favorite for fresh eating, canning, and preserves. The Bartlett pear is easy to grow and will reward its owner with beautiful blossoms in the spring, large and luscious fruit in late summer, and a continuous crop for as much as 100 years. Produces large, yellow fruit with a smooth and juicy white flesh in late August or early September — ideal for eating, canning and preserves Blooms just before the leaves appear in the spring, with showy white flowers
not rated $24.00 Add to cart
Belle Georgia Peach
Belle Georgia Peach
The Belle of Georgia peach is an old-time favorite that produces brilliant red flowers each spring and large fruit in late August.  The peaches are very firm and highly flavored, with creamy white freestone flesh tinged with red. While excellent for fresh eating, the fruit is widely used for desserts and canning. The Belle of Georgia peach is available in standard and dwarf sizes. While it is self-fertile, planting more than one tree is recommending to ensure a good crop.   

Hardiness Zones

The belle of georgia peach can be expected to grow in Hardiness Zones 5–8.

Mature Size

The standard Belle of Georgia peach grows to a height of 15–25' and a spread of around 8–20' at maturity. The dwarf variety grows to a height of 8–10'.

Growth Rate

This tree grows at a fast rate, with height increases of more than 24" per year.

Sun Preference

Full sun is the ideal condition for this tree, meaning it should get at least six hours of direct, unfiltered sunlight each day.

Soil Preference

The Belle of Georgia peach grows in sandy and well-drained soils. It is not drought-tolerant.

Attributes

This tree: 
  • Produces large, creamy white freestone fruit with a bright red cheek. The flesh is firm, white with a tinge of red, and highly flavored--ideal for eating, baking and canning.
  • Yields ripe fruit typically in late August.
  • Is self-fertile but provides a better crop when planted in multiples.
  • Begins to bear large crops at ages 3–4 and reaches full potential at ages 8–12.
  • Blooms in the spring, with a profusion of bright pink to brilliant red flowers.
  • Is available in standard and dwarf sizes. Our standard Belle of Georgia seedlings are budded to Nemaguard rootstock, and our dwarf seedlings are grafted to Prunus besseyi (Sand Cherry). Dwarf trees should be staked to help them bear the weight of the fruit and prevent leaning.
  • Has a chill hours (CU) requirement of 800–850. (Chill hours are the average hours of air temperature between 32° and 45° F in a typical winter season.)
  • Grows in a rounded shape.

Wildlife Value

The fruit of peach trees are attractive to birds and squirrels
not rated $24.00 Add to cart
Bradford Pear Flowering Tree
Bradford Pear Flowering Tree

Please follow and like us:

not rated $12.00 Add to cart
Brown Turkey Fig Tree
Brown Turkey Fig Tree

Description

A classic, all-purpose fig. Fruit is delicious fresh and in preserves. Dried figs make tasty snacks all year long. Tree needs protection when temperatures drop below 10ºF. Needs minimal pruning. May yield 2 distinct crops in locations with a long, warm growing season. Grows well in containers! Heat-tolerant. Ripens in June. Self-pollinating.

Characteristics

Fruit Color Brown
Fruit Size Small - Medium
Pollination Self-pollinating
Ripens/Harvest June
Shade/Sun Full Sun
Soil Composition Loamy
Soil Moisture Well Drained
Soil pH Level 6.0 - 6.5
Taste Mild, Sweet
Texture Fleshy, Soft
Years to Bear 1 - 2
Zone Range 5 - 9
 
not rated $24.00 Add to cart
Crabapple Tree
Crabapple Tree
Its no secret that deer absolutely hammer apples and crabapples, and we’ll go as far to say there may not be a more effective “draw and hold” to deer than a big grove of them. However, a big orchard of fancy named varieties can be a rather expensive and time consuming chore for the weekend warrior or gamekeeper to undertake…meaning less time and money spent managing the rest of your property when you are busy spraying for bugs and diseases that high end apples often require. To those who can put forth the extra effort and expense to plant and manage the larger, grafted cultivars we applaud you. That being said, we have a solution we believe may be a better option for most wildlife oriented folks, and it’s available in our super stout, yet seedling-sized “wild” crabapple. Our “wild” crabs are actually seedlings from our favorite crabapple selections and wild types such as: Dolgo, Transendent, Chestnut, Centennial, Whitney, and Prairie crab. Having a mixed bag of genetics and drop times from hardy, heavy bearing, disease tolerant favorites in an economical, and simple to establish and maintain rapid mast seedling should be a no-brainer to anyone wanting to spread some apple madness on their place. With our “wild” crabs, combined with tree tubes and a little extra TLC for the first few years of growth, expect flowering and fruiting to occur on some trees in as little as three or four growing seasons, with the remainders putting on heavy crops no later than seven or eight years. So if you’re looking for heavy crops of highly preferred apples dropping from late summer and on into fall, but don’t want to put your county extension agent on payroll, try our “wild” crabs on for size. Zone: 4 - 8 Soil pH: 5.0 - 7.5 Wildlife Value: Excellent. Site Preference: Full sun. Fruit Maturity Date: Late Summer, Early Fall Fruit: Pale green blushed yellow
not rated $24.00 Add to cart
elberta peach
Elberta Peach Tree
Most popular of all peaches. This yellow freestone is juicy, ideal for eating, canning and freezing. Fruit trees need a minimum of 6-8 hours of sunlight daily and regular water. They are not drought-tolerant. (self-fertile) (zones 5-9)

Mature Size

The standard Elberta peach grows to a height of 15–25' and a spread of around 15–20' at maturity. The dwarf variety grows to a height of 8–10' with a spread of up to 10'.

Growth Rate

This tree grows at a fast rate, with height increases of more than 24" per year.

Sun Preference

Full sun is the ideal condition for this tree, meaning it should get at least six hours of direct, unfiltered sunlight each day.

Soil Preference

The Elberta peach grows well in sandy and well-drained soils. It is not drought-tolerant.

Attributes

This tree: 
  • Produces juicy, yellow freestone fruit with a crimson blush--ideal for eating, canning, freezing and jam making.
  • Yields ripe fruit typically from late July to early August, though may be 4–6 weeks later in colder climates.
  • Is self-fertile but provides a better crop when planted in multiples.
  • Begins to bear large crops at ages 3–4 and reaches full potential at ages 8–12.
  • Blooms in the spring, with a profusion of dark pink to purple flowers.
  • Has a chill hours (CU) requirement of 800–950. (Chill hours are the average hours of air temperature between 32° and 45° F in a typical winter season.)
  • Grows in a rounded shape.
 
not rated $24.00 Add to cart
Elliott pecan tree
Elliot Pecan Trees

Elliot Pecan is a pecan variety planted predominately in Georgia and Florida. The first Elliot tree was a seedling in the lawn of the American lumberman Henry Elliot in Milton, FL. Elliot Pecans are now among the most popular pecan … Continued

not rated $24.00 Add to cart
fuyu persimmon
Fuyu Persimmons
Every knowledgeable deer (and deer hunter) knows the only thing better than having a loaded persimmon dropping her sweet treats is having a GROVE of “simmons” to choose from. Those single trees are great but it seems the deer don’t go too far out of their way for just one tree. If you really want to bring ‘em in close from great distances, establish patches of trees to see some real results. Since persimmons can produce fruit on small stature trees, you may also want to plan ahead by planting a faster growing tree to hang a stand in nearby.
not rated $24.00 Add to cart
Green Giant Trees
Green Giant Trees
Green Giant arborvitae is a hybrid cross between western redcedar and Japanese arborvitae. It is a large, hardy evergreen with a pyramidal to conical, uniform appearance. The dense, scale-like foliage in flattened sprays on horizon or ascending branches is a lustrous, medium green color that darkens or bronzes only slightly in winter. The leaves have a faint, pleasant fragrance. The young bark is cinnamon-red, turning to gray-brown or red-brown. Mature trees bear persistent, half-inch, oblong cones that emerge green and turn brown. 'Green Giant' tolerates a wide range of soils and temperatures but prefers moist, well-drained soil and sun to partial shade. It has some drought tolerance once established. Wet or poorly drained sites should be avoided. It is very salt-sensitive. Young plants should be protected from wind, but once established, this cultivar is wind-resistant and can withstand heavy snow and ice loads. It shows better resistance to browsing by deer than most arborvitae. Little or no pruning is required, but it shears easily if necessary. It is a fast grower, up to 3' a year under good conditions. Mature height averages 50'-60' with a 12-20' spread.  

Hardiness Zones

The green giant arborvitae can be expected to grow in Hardiness Zones 5–7.

 

Mature Size

The green giant arborvitae grows to a height of 50–60' and a spread of 12–20' at maturity.

Growth Rate

This tree grows at a fast rate, with height increases of more than 24" per year.

Sun Preference

Full sun and partial shade are best for this tree, meaning it prefers a minimum of four hours of direct, unfiltered sunlight each day.

Soil Preference

The green giant arborvitae tolerates a wide range of soil textures. Poorly drained and wet sites should be avoided, and it is very salt-sensitive.

Attributes

This tree: 
  • Will grow up to 3' per year until maturity.
  • Darkens or bronzes slightly in the winter.
  • Requires little or no pruning but can be sheared easily if necessary.
  • Should be planted 5–6' apart for a screen or hedge.
  • Is a public domain tree, meaning anyone can propagate it from cuttings.
  • Has no serious disease or pest problems.
  • Features tiny, scale-like, glossy green leaves that are packed closely together in overlapping rows on divided branchlets, displaying in a flattened, fan-like spray.
  • Yields 1/2" long oblong cones that emerge green in the summer and turn brown in the winter.
  • Releases a pleasing aroma when leaves are squeezed.
  • Tolerates wind once established and withstands heavy ice or snow, making it a good choice for a fast-growing windbreak.
  • Shows better resistance to browsing by deer than most arborvitae.
  • Grows in a pyramidal shape.

Wildlife Value

Arborvitae provides nesting sites and cover for birds and small animals. The flower buds, seeds and foliage are a food source, although this cultivar has greater resistance to deer browsing than most arborvitae.
not rated $19.00 Add to cart